P Money – Snake EP 2 Review

If this EP doesn’t kill some of the rumours flying around about P Money, it is because people do not want to see facts. This has some great songs on it, which can be repetitive in a row but makes it very clear how P Money feels about his current beef.

The production is aggressive with a lot of techno sounds to punctuate the message. Each beat has a slightly different flavour to help to give a new angle on the situation each time. The aim of this is to be in yoru face, which the beats here accomplish with ease.

The lyricism is smart with some focus on wordplay and others on imploring that he is spitting the truth. The rhymes are clever without losing emphasis on how real his point is in every bar. He gets his message across without having to change his delivery to try and make it work.

Overall, this is a great EP for showing that P Money will stand his ground against any accusation against him. Now with this chapter hopefully closed, he can go back to making great albums.

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Sean Price – Imperius Rex Review

This release has some great moments, but is not without its missteps. No part of it is bad, but some of it does not stand out amongst today’s rap elite and needs a little more finesse.

The production is powerful and gritty which helps boost the impact of Sean Price’s delivery. Each beat does a great job of creating the correct atmosphere for the song which helps keep the album cohesive. Something a little faster could help add something for a younger audience, but Sean Price knows what works for him and has used backings that are effective for him.

The lyricism is great with plenty of alliteration and clever rhymes to keep the legacy of Sean Price going. A lot of structured genius goes into making these bars really roll and land hard with the listener. A few attempts to change his flow might have helped add a little diversity but Price is in his element here.

The features help to make this so cohesive and the momentum going. Each guest only does a god job boosting Sean Price’s last album and only shows great respect for his memory. The guest selection on here honours Price in the best fashion.

Overall, this is a great project to show the greatness of Sean Price. This album will stand the test of time as a list of what could have been and how talented this legendary artist is.

Tyler, The Creator – Flower Boy Review

This is a great album from Tyler that is fluid and doesn’t need defending like his previous releases. he shows not only great talent, but personal growth as well.

The production is not as aggressive as on his last album and with the softer tones comes a project that is much easier to listen to. The songs are softer but without losing all of their hardness and shock factor in some cases. This is a side of Tyler the world needed to see and help connect with him on a more human level, which is easier accomplished with this backdrop.

The lyricism is great with a lot of smart wordplay and a lot of clever rhymes. Tyler tones down his delivery but has built up more skill which helps him add to his descriptive ability that is another positive point of this project. With the growth shown from this, there are no issues with Tyler’s performance.

The features are well chosen and fit into their respective songs easily and without sounding forced. Each shows what they are capable of without over stepping and out shining the main artist. there is a good mix of singers with this album as well, which adds another level of entertainment to an already interesting release.

Overall, this is the best album that Tyler has released as it encompasses a wider audience without alienating so many. Hopefully he can carry this mentality forward.

Meek Mill – Wins And Losses Review

This release is another showing of force from Meek Mill, with a renewed vigour for success. After a turbulent time, he has shown how he can pull it together to make good music.

The production is energetic and helps keep the pace as the project plays. Each song with similar atmospheres all have a lot of the same elements, but are varied enough that they don’t get confused for each other. Maybe something with more of an easy listening feel would help include another audience, but would not fit with Meek Mill’s delivery.

The lyricism is strong with plenty of wordplay and clever punchlines. With some poignant messages in the mix here, the impact is huge with the delivery and performance aspects boosting them. a softer delivery might show that Meek is expanding his repertoire, but having already added a lot to his arsenal here, it is not a big miss.

The features are great and help with the cohesiveness of this album. Each makes a great effort and shows their own skills, which always fit with the song they are on. A guest from further afield than the rap game would help make some more interesting moments, but this is a small price for the results displayed on this project.

Overall, this is an enjoyable album with some great moments and little filler. Meek Mill can hopefully take this and have a more stable year to come.