Kurupt – Kurupt’s Moon Rock Review

This is a good mixtape to let the world know that Kurupt is still very lyrical and can still make good music. A lot of the tracks are well trodden content but Kurupt keeps it entertaining and it has a lot of re-play value. And with a Kendrick Lamar song on the end dedicated to Kurupt helps to solidify the latter as a legend.

The production is good and is reminiscent of the G-Funk era of Hip Hop. It keeps things bouncy and energetic while being engaging and making the listener want to keep listening. There is a range of different beats helping to be more of an open palette for Kurupt to express himself.

Lyrically, Kurupt is still on point and does well in his endeavours to showcase his excellent talents. His wordplay is smart and is littered throughout the tracks and helps with the imagery which is an important part of rap. Kurupt has had a long career and his abilities look like they haven’t dipped a bit.

The features are good and do well to mix with Kurupt’s own style. They help add some additional depth to the mixtape as they help to break up the monotony of one voice through a whole project and gives additional points of view to each track. A good repertoire of names helps boost how many people may sit up and take notice.

One down point of this album is DJ Julio G and his interludes. It is good he helped Kurupt put this together, but his interludes are the same each time, or very similar, and it detracts from any track he may appear on.

Overall, this is a good mixtape and can be enjoyed by most. Kurupt is his spectacular self and the beats help him to do so. If you enjoy an older style of Hip Hop, then this is definitely something to at least look into. If your looking for something entertaining and energetic, this is also the project for you.

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Snoop Dogg – Thats my Work Volume 5 Review

This is another great throwback project from Snoop Dogg. This time he links up with Tha Dogg Pound, Daz Dillinger and Kurupt for those who arent aware, to create a G-Funk sounding project to kick back to. It recreates the G-Funk era perfectly while also incorporating their journeys and newer inspirations, like Snoops recent foray into reggae. That combined with the great chemistry the three of them has helps to create a good sense of cohesiveness.

The lyricism is present on not only every track, but by every artist. None of the three let down with their lyrics and they flow into each others style very easily. They each not only have their signature style and flows, but it is rare to find a group of individuals that sound not only different from each other but from most if not all other rap acts out there. Snoop especially shines through his diversity, being able to add the reggae flavour for a slightly different atmosphere.

The production is diverse with some freestyles over popular new tracks, some old songs they did together and some entirely new songs. The backing ranges from reggae to Hip Hop to even pop sometimes, which is a new direction for Tha Dogg Pound.

With the features only being when the trio jump on someone elses track, this helps to create a more cohesive project that showcases their talents on tracks picked for others.

Overall, this is a great project if your a fan of the rappers or a fan of the era, but it may not attract new fans as it doesn’t contain any of the factors that may make it considered “popular” but it is a fantastic project for kicking back and enjoying a great era of Hip Hop.

Daz Dilly – Weed Money Review

This album should be a lot more publicised than it currently has been. The tempo and rhythm of this album are quality and Daz does not disappoint when it comes to his fast paced lyricism. A lot of hypnotic beats and catchy lyrics help to create an album that you can stick on repeat and keep going for hours, if not more.

Daz’s style of fast paced rap is accentuated by fast paced beats and when it’s a more slowed down track, Daz switches to a slower, but no less incredible, pace while still being able to keep the listeners interest.

All the beats keep the listeners interest without their mind drifting too far from the song. Mostly upbeat tracks, they are relatively short which is good to stop the repetitive nature of up-tempo songs becoming stale. The cohesion of the album is helped by short skits at the end of some tracks.

The album only runs a bit over 50 minutes long which is a bit short for an album these days, but it’s cohesive so that the project overall is very listenable and has a lot of replay value, instead of a longer project of a lot of disjointed tracks. The shorter project is a greater achievement overall.

This project may not be the ground-breaking work that will put Daz back on top of the hip-hop world, like when Death Row Records was going strong, but it is a strong addition to the Daz Dillinger catalogue, even if he has shortened that moniker. Tell as many people about this album as you can because it is worth at least a few spins.