Ty Dolla $ign – Free TC Review

This album has a lot of what Ty has already showcased on, but the greatness is in its variety and vocal range of tracks. Ty uses a lot of different backings and stretches his voice to new notes to make this project work.

The production is very diverse with some almost country beats mixed in with the pop and club ones. The range of beats on here allows Ty to give a glimpse of the different genres his talent could extent to. Blending them together into this one album makes for a great listening experiance with no real issues for the beats.

The lyricism is not complex or complicated but as Ty is more of a singer than rapper, this is not the most important thing. The actual singing is impressive with his signiture voice and style being effective to enhance the impact of the words. Ty shows he is good at what he does and that he will keep being good at it.

The features do a great job of fleshing out the album with new voices. With Ty singing, each of the features carries the rap portion of the album and does a good job of carrying the burden. While not on every track, they really help make the project be more cohesive and entertaining.

Overall, this album is great for listening through in the background, its biggest problem being content. It is a lot of well trodden ground but with a fresh new crooner at the helm.

King Los – God, Money, War Review

This is an album intended to provoke thought and, to an extent, it does. However it lacks the energy to really make the songs stick and make the messages stay with the listener.

The production is good as individual tracks and all have the right tone for the messages. Each has an atmosphere that helps the impact of the messages when listneing to it. However they lack luster and do not have a lot ofreplay ability.

The lyricism is great and shows amazing creativity from King Los. His rhymes paint vivid pictures of what he is describing that unfortunately fade away as a new picture takes its place. Maybe changing up the content to less conscious naterial could help Los make tracks people will want to replay.

The features all add an extra dimension to the project as they are mostly singing which reflects well with King Los’ rap style. All the guests bring good verses that build each track up and help increase how cohesive the tracks are. A few more features that would push Los lyrically could be good, but these are all good choices.

Overall, this is an enjoyable album for the emotional listener who wants to hear of darker, thought provoking topics. However if you want something lighter, this may not be for you.

Kid Ink – Full Speed Review

This is a good project for Kid Ink as it shows him making a whole variety of tracks with some good features and some different flows. There is not a whole lot to criticise about this project.

The production is smooth and refined. The beats blend together easily and are accessible for both lovers of Hip Hop and to lovers of Pop music. The way the producers have put the tracks together comes across as very polished without a fault in them and that is a big bonus for this project.

The lyricism is there and is scattered throughout but may not be as involved as some would like. While Kid Ink does very well to involve wordplay and lyrical devices in this work, the songs aren’t saturated in them so as to help expand the audience further into the realms of Pop music. For Hip Hop purists, Kid Ink could have used more wordplay.

The features are good and add to every track they are on. Each helps to bolster the cohesiveness of the tracks and helps introduce different opinions and angles on the message of each track. If the features weren’t there, this project would not be as good as it currently is.

Overall, this is a great project for Kid Ink and for rap as a sub-culture of Pop music. Kid Ink may well be part of a movement to move Hip Hop out of the darkness and into the mainstream of radio around the globe.

Rick Ross – Hood Billionaire Review

This is not a good album. Each track is boring and only gets anyone’s attention by repetition of boring choruses that get stuck in the listeners head. The tracks are all very similar with generic content and it does not make for a good listen.

The production is heavy going and reverberate deep into the brain without being stimulating or enjoyable. All the tracks follow the same formula and if it wasn’t for Rick Ross shouting over the top of it, it wouldn’t twig anyone’s attention. In fact, it may be avoided in such high doses.

The lyricism is terrible. While Ross has the ability to rap, he does a terrible job at attracting any Hip Hop audience that may want to hear lyricism. That being said, he can paint a picture but these moments are far apart on the project and cant make up for the short falls.

The features don’t fit well with the project, the exception being Big K.R.I.T. Whatever track they feature on, they blend too much into the backing beat and Rick Ross’ own style. Big K.R.I.T should be praised for maintaining his individuality so well on his feature, sounding different and bringing a very refreshing relief to the whole project.

Overall, this album has a lot of areas of improvement and to say you enjoyed the whole project means you enjoy only type of song and you like to hear it over and over. Rick Ross has a lot to prove if he wants to stay eve close to Hip Hop elites.