Quavo – ATL Review

This release shows that Quavo can make enjoyable music without the other members of Migos. This collection of songs is full of energy but lacks a lot of depth in many of the offerings.

The production is trap based with lots of highs and plenty of atmosphere. Each beat has similar elements but uses enough different tones and sounds to make them individual. Maybe something further from his comfort zone would show a little growth in Quavo’s music.

The lyricism is good with some excellent descriptions and an interesting delivery to help keep things interesting. Quavo does use some wordplay and other devices to keep his rhymes impacting on the listener, but it can become repetitive, which is why keeping the project short was a fantastic choice. Maybe trying to embellish his words a little more could help push him further into stardom.

The features are excellent, helping to lift this project out of repetitiveness. Each has an excellent verse or chorus, showing their own skills as well as working well with the other artists. Some more singers would help add another dimension, but Quavo does enough singing on his own, even if it it with autotune.

Overall, this is worth a spin, but if the music of Migos is not for you, then this release from one member is most likely not either. Quavo will definitely appeal to his core audience however and possibly gain a few more listeners.

Chevy Woods – Gang Shit Only Review

This is another project about generic gang life without much personal addition from the artist. Chevy woods makes this entertaining enough, but it is not a great release.

The production is good with plenty of energy to move things along, but no backing that particularly breaks out from the rest. Each song has the correct atmosphere for the content but seems formulaic on a full listen through. While some beats may be worth a revisit but that is up to your individual taste.

The lyricism is alright¬†with some clever moments, but mostly focusing on his delivery and subject matter. While there is complex wordplay involved there isn’t enough to say this is a lyrical offering. A little more effort on the rhymes could go a long way.

The features are good as they help break up the monotony of one voice. Each does a good job to flesh out the tracks while showing their own skills. A few more singers would bring a little more depth, but the rappers still do good work.

Overall, this is a bit of a disappointing release from Chevy Woods, but should not be discarded straight away. If you enjoy the type of music that is being pumped out, then this could still be worth a try.

Rich The Kid x Migos – Still On Lock Review

This is an enjoyable mixtape but falls to a far too common flaw. Once you have heard one of the songs, it seems like you have heard a lot of the songs. A touch more variation wouldn’t go amiss.

The production is excellent and lends a good atmosphere to the track. The beats all run smoothly together and reflect the meanings of each song well. However, as the songs are so similar, some diversity would go a fair distance in making a more universal project.

The lyricism is alright but is nothing spectacular. The reliance on delivery and performance works well on the type of track the artists are making. On the other hand, some more lyrical acrobatics could make some tracks that would appeL to a wider audiance.

The features are alright but are very similar to the main artists when it comes to style. Each guest puts in good effort and has an alright verse that can bring a touch more cohesiveness to the project. Unfortunately, due to the stylistic similarities, thier performance can fade into the background as they can sound like the main artists themselves.

Overall, this is an entertaining mixtape that can showcase all the artists talent, but they could use a wider variety of content and backing. The next project from Rich The Kid or Migos should look to appeal to a wider audiance.

Soulja Boy Tell ‘Em – Loyalty Review

This is an incorrect title for this project as there appear to be no tracks about loyalty on the project. Its all about money and guns and all the things young men who aren’t already famous rap about. However with his money in hand, Soulja keeps rapping about the same things and it doesn’t come across as genuine.

The production is bass heavy and can be enjoyed, even with Soulja Boy rapping over the top. With such emphasis on bass, the beats can come across as one dimensional but there is enough variation and work through the album, that this is not too much of a problem.

The lyricism is poor at best with only a few instances of wordplay at all. Soulja seems to spend a lot of time repeating the same or similar phrases throughout all of the tracks and it makes for poor listening. Soulja needs to make some major adjustments to his rap style and improve his level of lyrical techniques if he wants to move forward in Hip Hop.

The features are slightly better than Soulja Boy but run in similar lanes to him and, while it does elevate the overall project, it is only a slight increase. They each put in good efforts and the delivery is better than Soulja and yet the overall album falls flat.

Overall, this is poor effort on every track and the title does not reflect what the songs are about. Soulja Boy needs to start thinking about the word cohesive and how it could be applied to his own work to help make a better overall album.