Rick Ross – Rather You Than Me Review

This release show more of a softer side of Ross that listeners might not have expected. There are a few of the more street based tracks, but they appear to have less effort put into them than then slower ones that Ross shines on here.

The production is great with a few gritty beats mixed in with the slower, emotional ones. The slowed down ones leave room for Ross to be more creative, whereas there is so much going on in the backing with the energetic ones that the lyrics can get lost. On the whole, it is a good choice to try to balance the productions but if you do, then you should put equal effort into both.

The lyricism is good with Ross doing more to prove he is lyrically nice on this project. While not evident on every track, the verses on this show personal growth as well as a possible increase in skill. Rick Ross does well to flex his lyrical muscles on these tracks, but maybe still try on the more hood based efforts too.

The features are good and help build up the cohesiveness of this project. Each does a great job of showing what they bare capable of and how it blends with the styles of the others on the songs. Maybe trying to bring up new artists could help solidify his status as a rap great, but the guest selection on here is fit for purpose and works well.

Overall, this is a great release for Ross as it shows he is still working on his talents and becoming the best to ever do it. Maybe trying to improve on the formulas he is using for a few of his songs might help, but this works as a project.

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Rick Ross – Black Market Review

This album shows both the strengths and weaknesses of Rick Ross. The songs tend to have good verses but the hooks really lack the flair to carry the song home.

The production is good with the atmosphere of each track being captured perfectly. There is plenty of energy running through the whole album and even the sombre moments having a certain bounce to them. Maybe some more traditional sounds could show that Ross has not forgotten how music has evolved but there are no real issues with the beat selection.

The lyricism is alright in the verses with most of the effort going into the delivery. While some of the hooks are ok, they tend to be the ones with features doing them. With more creativity going into the hooks and some more attempts at lyrical devices to up his rhymes, Ross could stop being considered the bottom of the top and start climbing some more.

The features do a good job of giving comparison points for Ross. Each on thier own does a great job of thier part while also helping to make thier tracks more cohesive with the rest of the project. There is a good balance of rappers to singers and the features may be one of the best points on this album.

Overall, this is a good album for those who like Ross but it can be difficult to sit through with the hooks being so plain. Creativity is needed in music.

Rick Ross – Black Dollar Review

This mixtape is a better project than his last album was. It has better hymes, beats and level of cohesiveness which shows an odd amount of concentration for Ross to be exhibiting.

The production is good with plenty of scope. There are interesting sounds and patterns used to make beats to encapture the listener and keeps the listen through sounding enjoyable. Some beats out of his comfort zone could have inspired even more interesting moments, but Ross works well with what he picks here.

The lyricism is not complicated or complex, but contains enough relevant and pertenant information that they can be entertaining when listened to. The content is what drives this along with above average delivery. Some attempts to try new things could show that Ross can evolve outside his comfort zone, but he sticks to what works for him to make music.

The features all help to increase the cohesiveness of this mixtape. They put in a lot of effort and on thier tracks that seems to push Ross to try harder as well. Some guests from further away from his comfort zone could make some more interesting tracks, but the poeple on here work well with Ross.

Overall, this is an enjoyable project that won’t be fun for everyone, but does show growth from Ross in his content. He just needs to try a few more new things.

Rick Ross – Hood Billionaire Review

This is not a good album. Each track is boring and only gets anyone’s attention by repetition of boring choruses that get stuck in the listeners head. The tracks are all very similar with generic content and it does not make for a good listen.

The production is heavy going and reverberate deep into the brain without being stimulating or enjoyable. All the tracks follow the same formula and if it wasn’t for Rick Ross shouting over the top of it, it wouldn’t twig anyone’s attention. In fact, it may be avoided in such high doses.

The lyricism is terrible. While Ross has the ability to rap, he does a terrible job at attracting any Hip Hop audience that may want to hear lyricism. That being said, he can paint a picture but these moments are far apart on the project and cant make up for the short falls.

The features don’t fit well with the project, the exception being Big K.R.I.T. Whatever track they feature on, they blend too much into the backing beat and Rick Ross’ own style. Big K.R.I.T should be praised for maintaining his individuality so well on his feature, sounding different and bringing a very refreshing relief to the whole project.

Overall, this album has a lot of areas of improvement and to say you enjoyed the whole project means you enjoy only type of song and you like to hear it over and over. Rick Ross has a lot to prove if he wants to stay eve close to Hip Hop elites.

Jeezy – Seen It All: The Autobiography Review

This is maybe not a story telling as the autobiography part of the title would suggest. It comes across as a collection of songs that are ordered from least emotional to most emotional. Not to say the songs don’t show a growth as a person for Jeezy as it shows him moving away from selling drugs and into the rap industry where he seeks bigger and better things.

The production is good throughout but feels a bit segmented, meaning that every few songs the production type and atmosphere changes to allow a step forward in emotional growth for Jeezy to express. It starts off very Trap and moves through the scale until you reach a more open audience range of beats that could be used for a wide range of genres. That being said, none of the production is bad, infact a lot of it is good and keeps the listener interested, it just needed some of the variation sprinkled over the entire album.

The lyricism is present as always and while it is not as prominent as the top lyricists in the rap game, it is included, just a bit more subtly. Jeezy uses his unique voice to stand out against the features. The features themselves are good and they reflect Jeezy’s own style which amplifies both performances.

Overall, This is a good album that helps showcase Jeezy’s evolution during his rap career and where he stands now. It may not be the greatest album of the year, but it is immersive and there will definitely be a few tracks for all rap fans to enjoy.