The Game -Streets Of Compton Review

This album may not be the most cohesive project out there, but it does reflect the state of Compton at the time of release. Game uses this to try and help aspiring and known artists to reach a wider audience.

The production is good and gives a great atmosphere that helps the messages of each track hit harder. There is some variation in styles, but the main sounds are gritty and street, to fit with the theme. Maybe a larger portion of the lighter side of things could have made a more balanced project, but this was made to highlight the negatives for the listeners, which it does.

The lyricism is great from Game yet again. He uses his gruff tones and clever wordplay to weave his messages into tapestries so you can picture what he is describing. Some more light hearted songs wouldn’t go amiss but Game knows what he is trying to say and puts it across well.

The features all do a good job of showcasing their skills and helping to bolster their name in the Hip Hop community. There are a selection of different styles which help make the project pop more. Only time will tell if they can capitalise and grow as artists.

Overall, this accurately depicts the currant state of Compton and of the artists currently making a name for themselves. Game gives them a good platform while still showing he can write great verses.

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Jeezy – Church In These Streets

This album has a real street feel from one of the larger names in Hip Hop. Jeezy show he is still in the touch with his street origins.

The production is good with plenty of grittyness to keep the authentic feel. Jeezy has chosen beats that allow his flow to be the main focus of the track and show that he has still got the underground touch. Maybe some more pop beats could help take this more into the public eye but Jeezy knows what he works well with and only uses those types of backing.

The lyricism is not overly complex but has a lot of delivery and performance boosts that make the rhymes impact harder. There is a real level of genuity with what he is saying and the raps are not without lyrical ability. Some more complicated raps could show an improvement in ability, but Jeezy does not slouch on this album.

The features are good because they are singing to help to broaden the scope of the album. With only two guests they need to help with the level of cohesiveness, which both thankfully do. Maybe somie more rappers to push Jeezy to further greatness but he still does well on these songs.

Overall, this album is great for those who enjoy Jeezy at his most street. This is a fantastic step for Jeezy to keep his profile high.

YG – Blame it on the Streets Review

This is a nice short album to remind people that YG is one of the new generation of rappers who shows real promise to keep West Coast Hip Hop alive. This album has a fair amount of throwback value to YG’s debut album “My Krazy Life” which is a good as that was also a good album. However with some repeat songs it can become difficult to really enjoy if you have heard “My Krazy Life” enough times.

The production is good and enjoyable for most listeners as it is very much in the style of popular Hip Hop producer DJ Mustard who has been known to craft some of the biggest hits of 2014. The range is good with some more energetic tracks mixed with an acapella freestyle and an acoustic cover of one of his previous songs. It is a nice blend of styles and flows which create a very diverse album.

The lyricism is good as the freestyle especially shows that YG can rap without the song being held up with the beat. It is clever in most places and where it isn’t, it is kept simpler to help get the point across. This helps YG to create a lot of imagery and show how he has grown as an artist since his debut album dropped earlier in the year.

The features are good but may not always be discernable from one another as some have similar voices. This is not a big problem but with so many features on so few tracks, it can start to feel less like YG’s album and more like a free for all. This doesn’t mean the features aren’t enjoyable though and they definitely help shape the tracks on the album with different pitches and some singing used to add more depth.

The other big thing about this album is it comes with a half an hour short film written and starring YG with the music being used from the songs on the album as well as some from his debut. This increases the entertainment value of the album as a different form of media helps to stimulate the listener and helps to show life from YG’s point of view.

Overall, this is a good pit stop on the way to a more streamlined and cohesive album but is still very enjoyable. The songs mixed with the short film can show YG in many lights ad helps to get his messages across better.