Jeezy – Church In These Streets

This album has a real street feel from one of the larger names in Hip Hop. Jeezy show he is still in the touch with his street origins.

The production is good with plenty of grittyness to keep the authentic feel. Jeezy has chosen beats that allow his flow to be the main focus of the track and show that he has still got the underground touch. Maybe some more pop beats could help take this more into the public eye but Jeezy knows what he works well with and only uses those types of backing.

The lyricism is not overly complex but has a lot of delivery and performance boosts that make the rhymes impact harder. There is a real level of genuity with what he is saying and the raps are not without lyrical ability. Some more complicated raps could show an improvement in ability, but Jeezy does not slouch on this album.

The features are good because they are singing to help to broaden the scope of the album. With only two guests they need to help with the level of cohesiveness, which both thankfully do. Maybe somie more rappers to push Jeezy to further greatness but he still does well on these songs.

Overall, this album is great for those who enjoy Jeezy at his most street. This is a fantastic step for Jeezy to keep his profile high.

Warren G – Regulate… G Funk Era Pt 2 Review

This extended play is a great throwback to the G Funk days that ruled the West Coast. Warren G brings back the smooth production and an old friend to create a short and cohesive project with a lot of replay value.

The production is fantastic and is perfectly recreating the old days of West Coast Hip Hop. Warren G has got beats that are laid back while also having hints of whatever the tracks need, whether it be aggression of party vibes. With so few tracks, it can be eblieved he did all he could with beat selection.

The lyricism is good and adds to the imagery. With his relaxed delivery, Warren G makes a comfortable, easy listening vibe that makes his music easy to enjoy. A few moments of a higher level of wordplay could bring in a wider audiance, however Warren G is known for his producing rather than his rapping.

The features are great and really help to flesh out the EP. The addition of Nate Dogg really makes the connection to the previous Regulate record to make this hit harder with the listener. There are no issues with the guest selection as there is a good balance of singing to rapping.

Overall, this is a very enjoyable and entertaining EP that is cohesive to listen to. Warren G has done G Funk proud with another stunning project.

Troy Ave – Major Without A Deal Review

This album is ruined by all the references to how successful he currently feels he is. However the arrogance displayed does not reflect his position in Hip Hop and this project may well have brought him down a stage.

The production is good and opens a variety of avenues for song content. Troy does try his hand at a variety of track types, but doesnt get into the groove of each beat to make the connections cohesive. While variety is good, he needs to limit it down to a beat selection he really gels with.

The lyricism is alright but the lack of substantial content really takes from the performance. Troy Ave does have some good things wrapped into his rhymes but the delivery and obsession with wealth take away from what could be some great songs. Troy needs to look into some new things to rap about if he wants to be an actual success.

The features are a mixture of cohesive guests to big name rappers who all do well on the tracks they feature on. All of them put in good effort and, while some do better than others, each shows they can be big in Hip Hop. Some features that dont fit the rap profile so much could have expanded the audiance for this project, but the guests on this are a good selection.

Overall, this could have been an enjoyable album but Troy Ave does not seem to care about how good the songs are as long as he can rap about money. He has a lot of work to do.

Jeezy – Gangta Party Review

The title of this mixtape describes exactly what you will find when listening to it. There is a track for almost any party scenario and Jeezy excels in this particular area.

The production is excellent and is all exactly what each track needs to stay energized and keep the atmosphere going. All the tracks have a slightly different feel while keeping the party vibe to keep the theme alive. Maybe some songs with a more emotional feel could make a more well rounded project but that is not in the spirit of this project.

The lyricism is good but is not near the best in the rap game. While the rhymes are entertaining and all lend themselves to the energetic party theme, it is not overly complex to bring in that particular audiance. However each track is enjoyable and the simplified rhymes help to get the party factor across.

The features all help with the energy factor. Most of them are up and comers who make trap music so fit in well with what Jeezy is looking to accomplish. This means that they each bring good effort to the track they are on to help make a cohesive project.

Overall, this is a good mixtape if you need something that the title describes. However it is not much good for anything else.

Young Dolph – High Class Street Music 5 (The Plug’s Best Friend) Review

This is another generic type project that is only slightly more enjoyable than the middle of the pack. Young Dolph may need to do more than he is at the moment to move higher up the rap ladder.

The production is good but becomes repetitive and can blend together into one track. The number of tracks crossed with this unfortunate set of beats means that listening to the whole mixtape can be a drag and that the listener may struggle to reach the end. If Young Dolph tries something new and outside of his current formula, it may show he is capable of more than the mediocre work he does on this project.

The lyricism is alright at best but is often poor and unentertaining. The delivery of the lines is what could make them enjoyable but even that does not come across as anything groundbreaking or done particularly well. If Young Dolph made his brand of rap a bit less generic and more lyrical, he may attract a bigger audiance.

The features are good and brings some big names to this project. It is unfortunate that they have been seen to struggle in some of the same areas as Young Dolph and get caught up rapping so much about money and what it means to them. Some of the guests struggle with delivery while others aren’t very lyrical and it all combines to be a bit of a let down when listening to the whole project.

Overall, this is a disappointing mixtape from Young Dolph who may have a steady income from his formulaic music but if he is looking to progress in Hip Hop, he needs to try and explore more styles of rap and new types of beats. Some more experimental features would also not go amiss.